Park Tool Master Link Pliers MLP-1.2 Review

Here is a great bike specific tool which you may really want.  It’s used for chains with master links, which is not all of them.  Generally, I find my KMC chains use a master link and my Shimano use a chain pin.  I think I prefer the master link as you can easily remove and reinstall the chain without having to buy a new pin.  Check it out:

Park Tool MLP-1.2

You can see it’s different than any other pliers and made to work with the round chain rollers.  I find this tool works perfectly with no issues, trying to use something like a need nose pliers can be challenging.  It is used to both open and close the link. 

Compatible with all 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12-speed derailleur chains that use a master link.  It may be made in the USA, but I’ve also seen it list as imported and made in USA.  Mine doesn’t say on it. 

Who needs this tool?

Anyone using a chain with a master link.  If you only have chains that use a pin rather than a master link you have no use for this tool.  I’ve used this with KMC chains with master links. 

We recommend this tool for anyone working with master links and give it a FAB 5 out of 5 gnome rating.  Buy yours today on Amazon:

Park Tool MLP-1.2 Master Link Pliers – AMAZON

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7 thoughts on “Park Tool Master Link Pliers MLP-1.2 Review

  1. I’ve wondered if that is a tool that is worth buying (like the third hand tool, which is a cheap marvel). You can often use master links even in chains that weren’t designed for them. Campagnolo uses a proprietary pin and tool, but a KMC master link works fine for a lot less money.

  2. I have a pair of these as well, and when I changed my chain this past Friday, I thought about this post. The tool really makes opening and closing the “quick link” so much easier. I wish there was a good, compact, lightweight tool that does the same thing. Maybe I’m in the minority, but I really don’t like quick links all that much. They seem much more difficult to work with than pins, especially out on the road.

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